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Health & Medicine

Closer to the “Holy Grail” of medical diagnosis

The ‘Holy Grail’ of medical diagnostics is an imaging technique that allows screening, diagnosis and monitoring of the progress of disease without damaging tissue or harming the patient. Processing and analysing large amounts of research data and collaboration between researchers play a central role.

Delivering the data for groundbreaking cancer research

When the Sheba Cancer Research Center in Tel Aviv wanted to transfer 300 terabytes of data from the US National Cancer Institute Center for Cancer Genomics in Chicago to local storage to advance their research, they thought the process would be relatively straightforward. It wasn't, and so they sought advice from Israel's NREN to find the solution.

High-speed drug discovery

How do you screen billions of drug compounds to find the right one? Connect a research team at the University of Alberta with a supercomputer 2,700 km away in Ontario using Canada’s high-speed national research and education network. Leveraging this powerful infrastructure, Dr. Michael Houghton and colleagues are speeding up the time it takes for life-saving drugs to be identified from months or years to weeks.

Swedish medical research goes East

Research & Education networks go where their customers go. So, while research and education grows increasingly global, networks do the same. One recent example is the prestigious Swedish Karolinska Institute’s opening of its first hub outside Sweden, the Ming Wai Lau Centre for Reparative Medicine in Hong Kong.

Life sciences researchers fast-track medical breakthroughs

Researchers collaborated across continents to advance our understanding of diabetic kidney disease and metabolic changes in pregnancy. High-speed networking plays a critical role connecting researchers and data in Australia to data, resources and colleagues located in Europe. 

Using simulations of acute care to aid stroke patients

The sooner a person suffering a stroke receives medical attention, the better the outcome is likely to be. Scenario training using simulation technology is helping hospital staff respond to these types of emergencies more efficiently.

Brazil breaks new ground with advanced telemedicine network

The Telemedicine University Network Rute in Brazil is considered the biggest initiative in telemedicine and telehealth in the world. Watch the interview with Rute’s coordinator, Luiz Ary Messina, and learn more about the reach and roadmap for this world-changing initiative.

Telemedicine: helping reduce deaths from cancer in Asia

Gastric cancer is the deadliest form of cancer in Asia. It accounts for the deaths of some 28 men and 13 women per 100,000. The Telemedicine Development Center of Asia has been building capacity to deliver valuable technical training for cancer specialists right across the region.

One event delivers remote surgical training to 1000+ Mexican physicians

By using high-definition videoconferencing technology and advanced academic networks, more than 1,000 Mexican physicians were trained remotely in the latest endoscopy procedures during a single event in 2015.

Making big data deliver

Researchers at the Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre in Melbourne wanted to know why there were an increasing number of patients – about a third of them women – being diagnosed with certain types of lung cancer when none of them had smoked and their families had no history of cancer. They turned to big data analytics.

Leveraging cloud services for better patient care

ARES (Advanced networking for the EU genomic Research) is implementing novel genome content distribution solutions to make large data sets accessible to healthcare practitioners for better patient care. Robust and bottleneck-free data networks are key to the success of this vital undertaking.

Driving the bioinformatics revolution in life sciences

The European Bioinformatics Institute (EMBL-EBI) near Cambridge, UK, distributes datasets worldwide using R&E connectivity. This biological data enables the discovery of new drugs, new diagnostics and increasingly new agro-chemicals. The Institute's work, which includes the 1000 Genomes Project, has generated petabytes of data and this growth is showing no signs of abating.