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Arts & Culture

American Presidents in an interactive classroom

The President of the United States of America is said to be the most powerful person in the world. To understand past presidencies, you want to get as close as possible to key presidential decisions. You need access to primary sources, and that is exactly what The Presidential Primary Sources Project is doing.

US schools and libraries embrace LOLA

LOLA is an open source, low latency audio and video conferencing technology that enables real-time, simultaneous, live musical performances across long distances. LOLA is emerging as an opportunity for schools and libraries to leverage their advanced high speed connectivity to allow students to greatly expand their musical horizons.

Artists from three countries perform live via video links

A music and dance performance in Copenhagen included live feeds of musicians in London and dancers in Barcelona. Thanks to LOLA technology the synchronised effect was as if they were all physically present on the same stage.

Sharing Shakespeare in sync – and winning awards

Although approx. 2555 km apart, theatre students from The University of Tampere, Finland, and Coventry University, UK, are rehearsing Shakespeare together, sharing a “virtual learning theatre” made possible by powerful videoconferencing equipment and high-speed connectivity.

Bringing high-speed internet to the birthplace of Zeus

Answering questions about the origins of Greek culture and athletics are at the heart of the Mt. Lykaion Excavation and Survey Project in Arcadia, Greece. Collaborative efforts within the R&E networking community have helped make the lives of the many archeologists in the field easier by bringing high-speed internet to the site.

Educating the future global musician

The Global Audition Training Programme aims to expand the skill set of student musicians, no matter where in the world they live, and prepare them for today’s multifaceted professional landscape.

Two pipe organs 2,000 km apart in concert

Because of its sheer size, a pipe organ is bound to the location where it’s situated, making it very rare for organists to be able to play together. Until now. A magic moment occurred at theTNC16 research and education network conference in Prague: two organs more than 2000 km apart will play a concert together, thus creating a completely new musical experience.

Helping Australian Museum scientists save endangered koalas

Access to cloud services, such as high-performance computing and storage, that are impractical for the museum to house on site is significantly improving the analysis process and the way data is shared between Koala Genome Project partners, opening the door to new insights for conservation and protection.

Playing with (real) time: antiquities, art and science come together over the network

“I was curious to explore the possibilities of a poetic approach to concepts of presence and absence in different places," says acclaimed director Giorgio Barberio Corsetti, who exploited the brand-new fiber optic connection to the Italian research and education network of major archaeological sites in Rome to create a unique live performance.

Building a long-term archive for cultural data

The DigiBern project is an online portal for information on the history and culture of the city and canton of Bern. Even in such an exemplary case, however, it has become clear that libraries face further tasks after a digitisation project is complete in order to ensure that the data remain accessible over the long term. SWITCHengines is enabling the University Library Bern to build a long-term archive.

Dancing beyond time: an encounter between tech and telematic art

Think of a dance performance in which the dancers, instead of sharing the same stage, are in different cities or even other continents. That is the mission of telematics dance, approaching dancers who are not necessarily in the same physical space, and creating other experience relations with the body and technological resources.

New technologies bring cultural heritage to life

“There’s an increasing interest in high-resolution imaging of world heritage sites because of recent events, iconoclasm or cultural cleansing, also climate change issues that are devastating cultural sites. With high-fidelity imaging you have a huge reservoir for being able to retell stories about these extraordinary places that are now under threat.”