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Fascinating stories from around the world about people and projects making a difference and connected by research and education networks.

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Rewriting the history of human beings with DNA

Eske Willerslev, one of the world’s leading experts in ancient DNA, DNA degradation, and evolutionary biology, is using powerful DNA sequencing technology to reveal fundamentally new insights, reconstructing the past 50.000 years of human history.

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Research data zones improve collaboration on crop genome data

The University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam University of Applied Sciences and SURF are collaborating on a campus network infrastructure that is optimized for sending research data. The aim is to create a blueprint for a research data zone architecture so researchers can more easily collaborate on data-intensive research. The first use case is focusing on crop genome data.

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Driving the bioinformatics revolution in life sciences

The European Bioinformatics Institute (EMBL-EBI) near Cambrigde, UK distributes datasets worldwide using R&E connectivity. This biological data enables the discovery of new drugs, new diagnostics and increasingly new agro-chemicals. Their work, which includes the 1000 Genomes Project, has generated petabytes of data and this growth is showing no signs of abating. On-demand bandwidth over R&E networks will therefore be critical to their ongoing work.

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Improving how complex diseases are treated

Genomics is generating new insights into the genetic causes of diseases such as cancer, diabetes, heart disease, and congenital disorders, and promises to transform healthcare. In Australia, a specialized high-performance network has been deployed for the Kinghorn Centre for Clinical Genomics, the largest genome sequencing centre in the southern hemisphere, helping to close the gap between research and the clinic.

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Dedicated line between supercomputers saves time for biomedical researchers

A dedicated line between two supercomputers in Denmark allows biomedical researchers to share data faster and easier than before.

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Making strides towards on-demand genetics data

Today’s scientists are riding an unprecedented wave of discovery, but the immensity of the data needed to facilitate many of these breakthroughs is creating internet roadblocks that are becoming increasingly detrimental to research. Finding ways to deal with “Big Data,” which is defined as data sets too large and complex for both traditional computers and average network throughput to handle, has become a science in itself. But with an eye to the future, Clemson University researchers are playing a leading role in developing state-of-the-art methods to transfer these enormous data sets from place to place using the 100 gigabit Ethernet Internet2 Network.

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DUMBO to the rescue – deploying ICT for emergency medical care in post earthquake Nepal

On the 12th of April 2015, a devastating earthquake hit Nepal, including its capital Kathmandu, demolishing half a million buildings, killing 8.800 and injuring over 16.000 people. The research and education network of Nepal, NREN, participated in the relief work by setting up emergency wireless networks at a number of hospitals treating earthquake victims.

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Streaming Colombia’s science and education

Since 2008 the Live RENATA streaming service has amplified Colombia’s research and education by transmitting thousands of hours of knowledge to a growing number of national and international Internet users, creating new opportunities for learning and discovery. Apart from in academia, this service is also used by government institutions to present policies and strategies. Other organizations have transmitted conferences about engineering, science and culture.

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Through methods of analysing fungi to victory in the orbit of Mars

Slovenian researchers analysed various aspects of the biology of extremophilic fungi, which can act as pathogens that are harmful to humans and used the same methods in their winning solution in data mining for the European Space Agency.

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A network for nobel prizewinning particle physics

Something the general public is unaware of is that several Swiss research groups were instrumental in proving the existence of the Higgs boson, and all of them rely on SWITCHlan to transfer data.

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Working hard to extend the reach of the Internet

Meet the Network Startup Resource Center, NSRC, collaborating with emerging research and education networks across the globe to extend the reach of the Internet.

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Building a network without a network

When you build a national e-network connecting students and researchers, you usually start out by burying fibre, and buying and installing equipment. But what do you do, if none of that is possible? You focus on making a difference for your users, and that is exactly what the American University of Beirut has been doing.

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Super-connectivity for one of the world’s brightest light sources

1200 researchers from all over the world visit the Brazilian city of Campinas near Sao Paolo every year, to work at the National Laboratory for Synchrotron Light, LNLS. Among other things, synchrotron light has been essential for the production of new drugs, fertilizers, cell analysis, the study of different types of soil and new sources of energy.

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Cleverly sharing workload across time zones

The control room is the first installation of its kind in America that can operate telescopes and fluorescence detectors at a distance, from Mexico to Argentina. It also maximizes usages times and optimizes the transmission of scientific data.

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Saving the stars for the future

In 2009, NASA launched the Kepler space observatory to discover Earth-size planets orbiting other stars. For four and a half years, Kepler photographed a small 10-by-10 degrees section of the sky, taking snapshots each minute. “This is a goldmine of data, and we won’t see anything quite like it in the foreseeable future,” explains Rasmus Handberg from the Stellar Astrophysics Centre at Aarhus University, Denmark.

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